Tag Archives: Culture

Counseling Is…by Tres Mali Scott History: A Black-American Experience!®

Counseling Is...by Tres Mali Scott History:  A Black-American Experience!®

Counseling Is…by Tres Mali Scott

Counseling Is…

History: Sometimes you have to remind people of what happened,

so that,

They will know what is going on

                                                        Tres Mali Scott

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Are They Allowed To Kill Any Negro They Want?: T. Martin’s Death? Murder or Self-Defense of Zimmerman? Our Black Families Face…?: A Black-American Experience!®

Are They Allowed To Kill Any Negro They Want?: T. Martin's Death? Murder or Self-Defense of Zimmerman? Our Black Families Face...?: A Black-American Experience!® This article is endorsed by A Black-American Experience!®  by Tres Mali Scott on Crisis Reporting a 2nd and 3rd Place Pulitzer Center Citizen Journalist Award Winner & Best Blogs 2010 by blogged in Crisis Reporting by Tres Mali Scott for The Writings of African-Americans

Tres Mali on A Black-American Experience!®

Our “Black Families” face everyday:

  • Racism,
  • Maintainance of our existing support and educational systems, and
  • Creating new support and educational systems.

Because of racism and experiences like T. Martin and Zimmerman, Historically Black education facilities have been built and will continue to be built. Our “Black Families” also have the right to educate free from intimidation and harassment.  This case, remember is the State of Flordia vs. Zimmerman, and in order to correct civil wrongs, the system that is in place can be used. Also remember, that if the system does not work, then we use the law to correct this as well.

An example of the importance of maintaining and  creating new educational systems is the school closing of  a historically Black-American College, Bishop College. Many of my family members (Parkers and Singletons) attended this college in the 1930s & 1940s.

Bishop College was a historically black college, founded in Marshall, Texas, United States, and later moved to Dallas, Texas, that operated from 1881 to 1988. The college was founded by the Baptist Home Mission Society in 1881 as the result of a movement to build a college for African-American Baptists. The movement was started by Nathan Bishop, who had been the superintendent of several major school systems in New England. Baylor University President Rufus C. Burleson secured a pledge of $25,000 from Judge Bishop during a meeting of the National Baptist Education Society meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to start the college. A committee of Baptist ministers from East Texas selected a location in Marshall, on land belonging to the Holcomb Plantation, Wyalucing.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bishop_College)

For its first several decades, Bishop’s faculty and administration largely consisted of white people. The first African-American to be president was Joseph J. Rhoads, who assumed the leadership role in 1929 and remained through the

Are They Allowed To Kill Any Negro They Want?: T. Martin's Death? Murder or Self-Defense of Zimmerman? Our Black Families Face...?: A Black-American Experience!® Bishop College was a historically black college, founded in Marshall, Texas, United States, and later moved to Dallas, Texas, that operated from 1881 to 1988. The college was founded by the Baptist Home Mission Society in 1881 as the result of a movement to build a college for African-American Baptists.

Bishop College Marshall, Texas

Great Depression and World War II.[2] During his presidency, Bishop phased out its high school programs and placed emphasis on its new two-year ministerial program. During the 1930s and 1940s the ministerial program evolved into the Lacy Kirk Williams Institute, which attracted national attention; its attendants included the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rev. Jesse Jackson. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bishop_College)

In 1961, after receiving a grant from the Hoblitzelle Foundation, Bishop moved to a 360-acre (1.5 km2) campus in Dallas. In Dallas, enrollments increased, peaking at almost 2,000 students around 1970.[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bishop_College)

The college closed in 1988 after a financial scandal led to the revocation of its accreditation, as well as its eligibility to receive funds from charities such as the United Negro College Fund. The campus, purchased in 1990 by Comer S. Cottrell, is now the site of Paul Quinn College.[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bishop_College)

In 2006, the president of Georgetown College in Georgetown, Kentucky proposed a plan to Bishop College alumni to make Georgetown their adopted alma mater. Georgetown offers scholarships to children or grandchildren of Bishop alumni or students nominated by Bishop alumni. Upon graduation, these students receive diplomas with the name and insignia of Bishop College. Georgetown president William H. Crouch Jr. hopes the program will help the college reach its goal of increasing minority enrollment to 25% by 2012.[4 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bishop_College)

Civil Rights laws that allow education free from harassment and intimidation in the United States of American also have an International equaliant, International Human Rights Laws from The Writings of African-Americans®: The Four Geneva Conventions of 1949: International Humanitarian Law. And when issues like these occur, not everyone is an American, and The Responsibility to Protect may also apply to America for Americans. The Writings of African-Americans®: What is Responsibility to Protect (RtoP or R2P)?

 We also have a personal responsibility to protect our children, spouses, family, and communities.  Many of our “Black Families” are of African Disporia.

The Historically Black Newspaper The Los Angeles Sentinel’s front page shows this tragedy in full color and black & white. With comments from President Barack

Are They Allowed To Kill Any Negro They Want?: T. Martin's Death? Murder or Self-Defense of Zimmerman? Our Black Families Face...?: A Black-American Experience!®

Trayvon Martin

Are They Allowed To Kill Any Negro They Want?: T. Martin's Death? Murder or Self-Defense of Zimmerman? Our Black Families Face...?: A Black-American Experience!®

Trayvon Martin (February 5, 1995- February 26, 2012)

Obama, Congresswoman Maxine Waters, Congresswoman Janice Hahn, L.A. Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, Council President Herb Wesson, and Congresswoman Karen Bass. Seeing a young person’s life in four pictures.

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July 22, 2013 · 11:51 pm

Merlin Santana from The Steve Harvey TV Show: Vision: Angels Do Speak!® on A Black-American Experience!®

—Merlin Santana was Fatally, from the Steve Harvey TV Show.

—Merlin Santana was Fatally, from the Steve Harvey TV Show.

At 12:58 p.m. on 7/27/2012 I had a vision of the young from the Steve Harvey TV Show that was fatally shoot in 2002, Merlin Santana. Tres Mali

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What are Bach Flower Remedies?: A Black-American Experience!®

Dr. Bach from Flower Remedy on A Black-American Experience!®

Dr. Bach from Flower Remedy on A Black-American Experience!®

Dr. Edward Bach discovered the Original Bach Flower Remedies which is a system of 38 Flower

Bach Large Wood Set on A Black-American Experience!®

Bach Large Wood Set on A Black-American Experience!®

Remedies that corrects emotional imbalances where negative emotions are replaced with positive.

 

The Bach Flower Remedies work in conjunction with herbs, homeopathy and medications and are safe for everyone, including children, pregnant women, pets, the elderly and even plants.

 

The Bach Flower Remedies is a simple system of healing that is easy for anyone to use (bachflower.com).

 

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A Black Sterotype: Ice T: A Black-American Experience!®

Rapper, Actor, & Film Maker "Ice T"

Rapper, Actor, & Film Maker “Ice T”

If you would like to read a sterotypical profile of a “Black” person in America, read the “Ice T” entry on Wikipedia.org: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice-T

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Mohammed Mubarak Art “Obama Home”: Art Review: A Black-American Experience!®

"Mohammed

Mohammed Mubarak has a beautiful portrait of the “two faces of Obama” called “Obama Home”. You can purchase this portraitat www.mubarakart.com. Get a part of American History. President Obama is the 44th President of the United States of America and the first African-American Presient of the United States of America.Mohammed Mubarak also has art work, photography, and produced murals, including a portrait of a Liston and Ali fight. Enjoy the Black History the told and untold stories.

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A Black-American Experience!®: “The Mississippi Boys” I Call Them “Sirs”!

The Scott or Mississippi Boys on A Black-American Experience!®

The Scottsboro Stories from Jackson County, Mississippi, one of these stories includes my family. The Mississippi Boys, I never knew their name, they were a story to me.

The Mississippi Boys are now “Men” I call them “SIRS“!  Not just a name, but also a title.

SIRS” is a title, “MISSISSIPPI BOYS” is a name.

I have and poem about these run away slaves, that slept in the swamps and attended college at the end of The United States of America Slavery. First the article and then the poem, please read and enjoy them. Tres Mali

From Helium.com:

In 2006 I saw a Government issued calendar that did not have “Black History Month” listed for observances. I became very upset. Many Black people died not only for Blacks, but also for other races and for this country. My Great Grandfather was a slave, he had a friend that was the slave owners son. The slaves knew math very well, they had to count how much cotton they had. One day the white boy decided he wanted to learn math, so he told my Great Grandfather, “I will teach you to read, if you teach me math.” They thought each other. As a result, my Great Grandfather was a member of the United States of America Armed Forces. As the white men would say “He is a Nigger that can read”.

After slavery, some of my run away slave family slept in the swamps, they attended college after the war, white women educated them. It is 2008, Black History Month is the “shortest” month of the year, and we are now educated enough to educate ourselves. I attended a Historical Black University, and three Historical White Universities. The class education was not much different, but the social opportunities are very different.

The Historical Black University I attended is now about 40% white, and the Government seems to acknowledge Black History Month about 40% of the time. I am Black 100% of the time and those that gave their lives just because they are Negro, Colored, Afro-American, Black, or African-American are 100% of the time. This countries Racism showed the importance of recognizing other cultures. We are no longer a “Melting Pot“. We are a “Mosaic”. Meaning, no longer do we have to give up who we are, multiculturalism allows us to share our cultures with others. Black people in the United States of America has given that opportunity to all Americans. “IT ALL STARTED WITH BLACK HISTORY MONTH!”

Learn more about this author, Tres Mali Scott.
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Po
Poem from Tres Mali Scott’s Poetry & Short Stories about “The Mississippi Sirs!” Better known as, “The Mississippi Boys” or “The Scot Boys”:

Modern day slavery on A Black-American Experience!®

In fields we kneeled to pick cotton

-moved from our land

-it takes more than just hands to build roots

-The cast of slavery gives us a ban

-running from torture in the water and through sand

-we read from the swamps

-college & education, a new socio-class

-we adapt to technology, because change is coming fast.

We Build roots in our new land!

-it takes more than just hands to build roots.

Tres Mali

First version of the poem published July 20, 2008 named Building Roots by Tres Mali Scott

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